Wednesday, January 7, 2009

Who is Giving Joe the Plumber Career Advice?


Those of us in the career management business often tell clients in a tight economy that expanding their job options could be a good idea.

I guess that's why Joe the Plumber's career path now has taken him to the Middle East to be a War Correspondent.

We do know that shortly after Joe the Plumber was introduced to the general public by the John McCain campaign, it was disclosed that he really didn’t have a career as a plumber. He was neither licensed to work independently nor to be an apprentice working with a real plumber. Joe the Plumber's gig as campaign sidekick didn't last long enough for him to get a new wardrobe out of it, but long enough to get an agent and a book deal.

"His" book, titled, "Joe the Plumber - Fighting for the American Dream" was published by PearlGate and in the market within weeks. The book’s marketing says readers will "discover the real story that hasn’t been told about his, (Plumber's) infamous rendezvous with (Barack) Obama, the real and personal impact of the illegal invasion of his privacy by Ohio State officials, his eye-opening experience with Governor Sarah Palin, and the tough question he asked John McCain while on his Straight Talk Express".

I thought about purchasing this timely tome, but couldn’t figure out what would be on the other 188 pages. Since he wasn’t a licensed plumber, I figured I couldn’t trust any plumbing advice in the book. The book is currently available on Amazon for $16.47 for anyone interested.

Fast forward to now, a mere 80 days since he first got on the scene and Joe the Plumber is now in Israel as a war correspondent. His reputation clearly preceded him, since he has been shown around the war zone by none other than Danny Seaman, the head of Israel's Government Press Office.

Now, I certainly don't want to speculate about whether or not this new assignment may be Joe the Plumber's career calling. I know many people who have fallen into great, lifelong careers completely by accident or divine intervention. (;>

I do believe, however, that when adults move through so many career roles in less than three months, s/he could possibly benefit from a little bit of career coaching.

What would your advice be?

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